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SWIFT CREEK

Recreation
On this primitive site, visitors may enjoy biking, hiking, horseback riding, and wildlife viewing on administrative roads.

Access
Swift Creek tract from White Springs:
Take CR 25A west; the entrance to the Swift Creek tract is on the left.

Size
Swift Creek – 328 acres

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WHITE SPRINGS

Recreation

White Springs Tract

White Springs includes approximately 1 ½ miles of river frontage along the Suwannee River. White Springs is well known for wild azaleas blooming along the river bank in the spring and its bicycle trail.

The Florida National Scenic Trail (FNST) rambles through the White Springs tract along the river bank on its journey across Florida. The FNST begins at Big Cypress in the Everglades and extends to Gulf Islands National Seashore in the western panhandle.  It shares a treadway with the bicycle trail built and maintained by Suwannee Bicycle Association

White Springs tract contains a range of biodiversity including mesic flatwoods, scrubby flatwoods, wet flatwoods, bottomland forest, dome swamp and basin swamp natural communities at the base of the Cody Enscarpment.  The Cody Scarp is a geomorphologic formation that runs across north and central Florida. It approximates an ancient shoreline of Florida from a time when sea levels were much higher. The Cody Scarp represents the largest continuous topographic break in Florida. For more information about the Cody Scarp, visit mysuwanneeriver.com.

Visitors may enjoy wildlife viewing, fishing, hiking, and biking on administrative roads and designated trails.

Bicycling and Hiking at the White Springs tract

Bridge to Bridge Trail – The 4.5-mile single-track intermediate to challenging trail has plenty of sharp turns, climbs and descents.  It follows the river for more than a mile with many scenic overlooks.  Experienced off-road riders with good technical riding skills will enjoy this trail.  It easily connects to the Gar Pond Trail on the Gar Pond tract and the Beast of Burden Trail on the Little Shoals tract for longer rides.

Florida National Scenic Trail -From Suwannee River Wayside Park Trailhead hikers will enter the District owned White Springs tract. The 3.5-mile trail passed through scrubby oaks, saw palmetto and pines along the Suwannee River.  It exits the tract at the Adams Memorial Circle Trailhead. From there hikers will have opportunity to road walk through Historic Downtown White Springs to Stephen Foster Culture Center State Park.  On the White Springs tract hikers, will share portions of the trail with bicycles.  For a loop trail the hiker can follow the administrative road (5 miles total) back through the tract or follow the sidewalk (4.5 miles total) along US 41 back to the Suwannee River Wayside Park Trailhead

Access
White Springs tract from White Springs:
Travel south on US 41, turn right on Adams Memorial Circle, go past Riverside Cemetery. The pavement ends and the street becomes dirt; the tract entrance is on the right. The second entrance is at the US 41 boat ramp.

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SUWANNEE SPRINGS PARK

Recreation
The Suwannee Springs Park is a historic park featuring the old spring house that was built in the 1800s around the sulfur springs. Visitors can swim in the springs, picnic, and enjoy the snow white river sand bars.

Visitors may also enjoy fishing, as well as biking, hiking, and wildlife viewing on the Suwannee Springs Tract’s administrative roads. Canoes and kayaks may be launched from the Suwannee Springs Launch.

Access
Suwannee Springs Park:
Travel north on US 129, turn right on 93rd Drive (Old US 129), travel north to 32nd Street, turn right, and follow the street to the parking lot.

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STEINHATCHEE FALLS

Recreation
On the Steinhatchee Falls Tract visitors may enjoy fishing, biking, hiking, horseback riding, and wildlife viewing on administrative roads. Canoes , kayaks and small boats may be launch at Stephens Landing (River Access 10.8) or Steinhatchee Falls Park (River Access 9.7).

The Steinhatchee Falls Park features a small scenic waterfall. The Steinhatchee Trail is a 3-mile, multi-use trail that begins at the trail head on SR 51 and ends at the park.

Access
Steinhatchee Falls tract from Perry:
Travel south on US 19 to SR 51, turn right and the tract is on the left past the convenience store.

Steinhatchee Falls tract from Cross City:
Travel north on US 19, turn left on SR 51 and the tract begins on the left past the convenience store.

Entrance to Steinhatchee Falls Park from US 19 and SR 51:
Travel 1.75 miles south on SR 51 to Steinhatchee Falls Road, turn left and follow the road to the dead end, turn right and the road ends at the park.

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STEPHEN FOSTER STATE PARK

Recreation
The Stephen Foster Tract is managed as part of Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park and has biking and hiking trails as well as birding and wildlife viewing on its many trails. The Florida National Scenic Trail traverses the tract along the river. The 7-mile Foster’s Hammock Loop Trail rambles through the tract.

Access
Stephen Foster Tract from White Springs:
Access to the Stephen Foster Tract is through the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park.

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ROCK BLUFF SPRINGS

Recreation
Rock Bluff Springs is a part of J. H. Anderson, Jr. Memorial Park owned by the Suwannee River Water Management District and managed by Alachua Conservation Trust. Visitors may enjoy swimming, picnicking, hiking and wildlife viewing.

Rock Bluff Springs is a second magnitude spring with a short spring run out to the Suwannee River. The spring has multiple openings from the aquifer and ringed with cypress trees around the edge.

A half mile trail carves through the upland hardwood forest where visitors have an opportunity to explore some of the features adjacent to the spring.

Access
Rock Bluff Springs – J. H. Anderson, Jr. Memorial Park from Bell:
Travel north 3 miles on US 129, turn left on CR 340, go west 3 miles and the Park entrance is on the right.

Address: 6560 NW CR 340, Bell, FL

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LITTLE SHOALS

Recreation
Little Shoals Tract visitors may enjoy biking, fishing, hiking, and wildlife viewing on administrative roads and designated trails.

Biking at Little Shoals and Falling Creek

Beast of Burden Trail– The trail is on Little Shoals and Falling Creek tracts.  The 7-mile intermediate trail is not called the beast for nothing.  It is a challenging single track trail which includes a wide variety of terrain marked with yellow blazes.  The trail is divided into two loops the 5.5-mile front loop and a 1.5-mile Lollipop Loop that crosses Falling Creek onto the Falling Creek tract.

Hiking at Little Shoals and Falling Creek

The 3.5-mile hike from Little Shoals Trailhead to Bell Springs Trailhead meanders along the river passing through the Little Shoals tract.  Upon leaving the Little Shoals Trailhead, the shoals are approximately one-hundred yards upriver. The trail is on top of a natural berm as it passes through scrubby oaks and saw palmetto before transitioning into mixed hardwoods and pines along one of the highest bluffs overlooking the river as you near Falling Creek. The trail descends a steep bank crossing the creek onto the Falling Creek tract.  It wanders 2.5 miles along the river through scrubby oaks, saw palmetto, pines into a mixed hardwood forest before reaching the Bell Springs Trailhead.

From Little Shoals Trailhead, hikers can travel 1.5 miles to the Suwannee River Wayside Park Trailhead. This trail follows the Suwannee River from Little Shoals Trailhead to the US 41 bridge.  Hikers will need to cross the US 41 bridge and turn left into the Suwannee River Wayside Park Trailhead.

Access
Little Shoals tract from White Springs:

Travel south on US 41, cross the Suwannee River and turn left on NW Egypt Terrace; the entrance sign is on the left.

Size
Little Shoals – 400 acres

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HOLTON CREEK

Recreation
On the Holton Creek tract, visitors may enjoy fishing, as well as biking, hiking, horseback riding, and wildlife viewing on administrative roads. Hunting is for persons who are mobility-impaired. For more information on hunting, contact the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at:

386.758.0525
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Note: Hunting is allowed in permitted areas only.


The Holton Creek River Camp is the second river camp between White Springs and Branford and provides 5 screened shelters, a picnic pavilion, restrooms with hot showers, and a tent-camping area. For more information on the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail, call or visit:

800.868.9914
Suwannee River Wilderness Trail

Access
Holton Creek tract from Jasper:
Travel south on CR 249 approximately 11 miles to SW 64th Terrace, turn left into Holton Creek.

Holton Creek tract from Live Oak:
Travel north on CR 249 crossing the Suwannee River and the road becomes CR 751; travel .25 miles, turn right on CR 249; travel one mile, turn right on SW 64th Terrace into Holton Creek.


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HOLTON CREEK RIVER CAMP

Recreation
The Holton Creek River Camp is part of the Holton Creek Tract and the second river camp between White Springs and Branford. The river camp provides 5 screened shelters, a picnic pavilion, restrooms with hot showers, and a tent-camping area. For more information on the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail, call or visit:

800.868.9914
Suwannee River Wilderness Trail

Access
Holton Creek River Camp is accessible only from the river. No vehicles are allowed. Outfitters can work with visitors to deliver gear, coolers and food to the river camps. Ask your outfitter for specific services.

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HOLTON CREEK RIVER CAMP

Recreation
The Holton Creek River Camp is part of the Holton Creek Tract and the second river camp between White Springs and Branford. The river camp provides 5 screened shelters, a picnic pavilion, restrooms with hot showers, and a tent-camping area. For more information on the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail, call or visit:

800.868.9914
Suwannee River Wilderness Trail

Access
Holton Creek River Camp is accessible only from the river. No vehicles are allowed. Outfitters can work with visitors to deliver gear, coolers and food to the river camps. Ask your outfitter for specific services.